About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 5
CNBC 1
CNN 1
CNNW 1
FBC 1
KBCW (CW) 1
KICU 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
there are three exceptions -- uc-berkeley, ucla, the university of michigan, they did not garner the same amount of racial and ethnic diversity using alternatives. but what is notable is that those three universities are the ones that are most likely to draw on a national pool of applicants, which means that the number of black and hispanic students is likely to be depressed for an artificial reason. these are the schools that have to compete with other schools on an unfair playing field against competitors who are free to continue to use racial preferences in admissions. so a highly talented students of color who gets into uc-berkeley without a racial preference is also likely to be admitted to an even more competitive institution like stanford with a racial preference. it is not surprising that university of michigan, uc- berkeley, and ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions which do not to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduate school? rick sander is here from ucla law school. we will hear from him about the p
to half brother allen. they hooked up a couple times. leading late in the game over ucla. 42-17. >> wow. >> shocker. >> all right. one more time for sports at 11:00. that does it for us. see you at 11:00 on cbs 5. good night. the ,,,,
students at ucla with large preferences who have a 90% chance of congratulating the only 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. so that i cumulatively meant that only 45% of the students with large preferences that were admitting went on to go through law school and get their degrees. it wasn't hard to look at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were not receiving very large preference is typically on a scale of a couple hundred s.a.t. points or ten to 15 that the traits were generally very poor for this group only about one-third starting infil law school in early 2000 were graduating and passing the bar on their first attempt. this was affecting the
's hard to say who is supposed to win these days in the pac 126789 ucla's matt barkley hooked up with one of his favorite targets lee. the trojans at one point led arizona, but the wildcats came back. wildcats wind and they hand their trojans their second loss of the season. >>> bret hundley escapes trouble for the bruins and fires downfield for thigpen, who completes the scoring play. ucla won on a field goal goal as time expired. the event that they call the world's largest cocktail party spilled over to the pregame as georgia met florida. bulldogs leading by 1, when aaron murray hit malcolm mitchell. georgia knocks off the no. 3 team in the country, 17-9. 5th-rank notre dame trying to keep its perfect record in the difficult venue of norman, oklahoma. notre dame would go on to win 30-13 with an 8-0 record. >>> alabama taking on another unbeaten team, mississippi state. bulldogs couldn't keep up. mccarron finds an open bell. bell does rest and they are 8-0. >>> collin klein with one of two rushing touchdowns for him. the wildcats keep their national championship hope as live at 8-0. >>>
fewer african-americans at berkeley and ucla. when racial preferences were admitted -- this was not actually about outcome. those students who had been admitted to berkeley and ucla were going to school and had higher success rates and because berkeley and ucla afforded so many minority students with a national reputation to do so the race neutrality increased the integration across campuses. one of the things we talk about in the book is the cascade effect. when elite universities admit students, a four paid graphic in the book illustrates this. have the first pick and the students there would like to admit through preference. so they admit not only the very top african-american, hispanic, they also admit those in second, third and fourth tiers of academic achievement. that means when the second tier schools use preferences they start far down the ladder. ironically that means the largest preferences are not used by the most elite schools but schools that are in the third or fourth tier of all colleges. this is important for couple reasons. when is it helps explain
intelligent and articulate. he went to ucla. he ended up going to do ucla. >> you are on the campus of usc. >> we won't get excited about that. so much of what he did with his life was an example. after his sports career, he became a businessman. a very successful businessman. he pointed out things and with regard to economics that black americans needed to know about. he was very -- very much a wall model and mentor in many of the aspects of his life. >> that's call from our viewing audience is lisa in nashville. caller: thank you for taking my call. i love c-span 2 and "book tv." mr. kareem abdul-jabbar, it is such an honor to talk you into here about the book you have written. i knew you were an author, but i did not realize how many books you have written. what was the title of your first book and how do you decide on the subjects of iraq's? >> the title of my first book was a giant steps. it is my biography. i'm a pretty tall person, i take long steps. that's how i got the title of my book. but i choose my subject matter with regards to how to impact people and explain things about am
. is that a compromised position? >> it is a possibility, and universities like ucla have tried class-based affirmative action. the problem is it's not a perfect corollary forays, and universities find that they admit poor white kids as well and don't find it's as effective as affirmative action in getting minority applications. >> eliot: same-sex marriage are there votes to the right of same-sex marriage or will that strike down some of the federal statute that prohibits marriage for same-sex couples. >> i think your second session will be more likely. people think the court is more likely to rule before it takes up same-sex marriage. just as anthony kennedy has been siding strong with gay rights, it's not clear by the obama administration position that all discrimination based on sexual orientation should be subjected to the highest scrutiny. that could be a tight hotly- hotly-fought case as well. >> eliot: where kennedy goes with the liberal views on the court and roberts go to the conservative, and roberts saying, who is turning coats on us now. >> he likes it to be the kennedy court and not the ro
competitive institution like stanford is not surprising as the receipt of uc-berkeley, ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions would still not end to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduates jack ray sanders is here from ucla law school and all your little bit from the program that he said the letter. ucla has of strong program of providing a leggett to economically disadvantaged students. you can see in the data that if you look at african-american students 22 of 63 under the socio-economic program, the economic disadvantage to students. compared to only 12 out of 382 who were admitted through other programs. that is to say, more african-american students were admitted through the socio-economic program than the regular program even though the socio-economic program a much smaller. overall, if you look at the results that ucla law school, 56 percent of the students admitted through socioeconomic affirmative action or black or hispanic compared to just 6 percent of those not admitted through those progra
there is cal football vs. ucla on saturday night. there is also the play out of a's playoff games at the plate at the coliseum this weekend. get ready there is plenty to choose from. >> live in those lives sponsored by jeep will be carried here on conn. the blue angels will prthe performance of their legendary air show here on kron4. 0ñ@Ñ >> 7:40 a.m. taking a look at temperatures as a pretty warm start to the morning. we have some '60s to report 62 in oakland 63 in san jose. we will warm things up as we head into the afternoon. the red on the screen indicates low 90s with temperatures a much cooler until we saw yesterday. as pleasant conditions along the coast line and a little bit of cloud cover along the coast. the fog will come back into the evening hours by 8:00 p.m. look at how low those temperatures will go.that greatn indicates the '60s. afternoon highs '80s in the south bay 81 and sunnyvale 84 expected in campbell a degree warmer than that in los gatos and to an lp this 93 expected in livermore san leandro is at 79 degrees and a court to stay on tap for the north bay spots 84 and ab
wildcats tomorrow and the cow bears taking on ucla at new memorial stadium. sold out justin bieber concert at the oracle arena. madonna at the hp pavilion, florence and the machine at the shoreline tonight. we in the bay area could experience our version of carmageddon, people are urged to take mass transit. coming up, how local systems plan to handle the increase in ridership. a live report on the records that could be broken this weekend. >>> with a new jobless rate, it said the u.s. economy generated only 114,000 new jobs in september, however the unemployment rate went down. the jobless rate is 7-point 8%, it's down 3/10th from august, the lowest rate since january 2009. labor department revised upward the job creation numbers for july and august and a separate report shows 873,000 people found new jobs last month. we will bring you more on the jobless numbers when we get our report from the washington dc newsroom at 7:15. >>> drive by shooting overnight in san jose injuries one man. it happened on roberts avenue around 11:00. authorities say the man was shot in the nose, and the hand.
at ucla where i had been getting my ph.d. -- the world views of these tea partiers. one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others is they have a very traditional view of the american dream. a 12 million -- toquevillian view, if you look. they have this view that all people of all backgrounds can succeed. this is not to say that other americans do not have this view, but they have this believe even more so, and it permeates how they answer poll questions and also helps explain a lot of their other policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. let's go through this -- these are some pictures i took at a washington, d.c., tea party protest. you often see signs like this. "do not spread my wealth -- spread my work ethic." "stop punishing success and rewarding failure." this is part of a common theme throughout the tea party. throughout the tea party. for this
. a professor at ucla is 12 matched different economic ag working donors or students at schools. 1.2 million dollar prize was awarded four outstanding example of economic engineering. it continues a strong run of decades. economic stride was not part of the original set in the will but added in 1968. ashley: and the e.u. one it. that cheapens it. but congratulations. lori: i will reserve comment [laughter] ashley: that is my 310 days worth we have nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. >> we see up arrows today. we have three out of four last week selling on wall street. looking at analyst colleen this to upgrade their shares to the outperform rating from perform. look at toymaker hasbro. the holiday season it turns out goldman sachs is not so hot on this sector including mattel. being more cautious and neutral putting the celebrating on hasbro in particular that the spending per-capita people will spend less per person. and acceleration of boys' toys is dwindling. lori: the trade war heating up between the u.s. and china? we need to be concerned about doing business here? gordon chan
that we did at ucla, back in 1988, because of the height difference between michael dukakis, the democratic nominee and george herbert walker bush who is four or five inches taller than him. we to build a bubble in front of the podium for governor dukakis to stand on so he would appear relatively the same height. it is little things like that that we have to deal with. >> tell us about a little thing like that as far as this debate. the podium or the temperature in the room. >> well, you know, we try to keep the temperature at 65 degrees. i always tell my wife and daughters when they come, bring a pashmina because the hall is very, very cold. has to be with the lights and cameras. we try to keep it there. sometimes it varies. the podiums will always be the same size for the men and women who participate in these debates. and so, you know, we sit down, we work with the staff of our professional staff and then they -- each of the candidates also has a staff that is here. we walk them through, showing how things will go. as you know, we'll take both candidates through this afte
of stable allocations and the practice of market design, one is a harvard gentleman, the other ucla. steve liesman passed over again, you look at the politicization of the way the nobel peace prize is handed out. >> there were questions last week after that was given to the european union. >> it was like a mirror on the cover of "time," you are the person of the -- once everybody's the person of the year, does it mean anything after that? and if they give it to the eu, who gets it, is cuba getting it next year? it doesn't seem -- >> although they could use the money. >> exactly. >>> steve liesman has breaking comments from new york fed president william dudley. steve? >> thanks, becky. bill dudley president of the new york fed really coming down and explaining some of the recent fed policy moves and suggesting that they will be around for a while, saying the main reason for economic underperformance is lack of demand. the u.s. recovery he says is weak in part because of a weak global recovery, also talking about negative feedback loops, once things get bad, they stay bad and he's saying th
academic colleagues at ucla where i've been getting a phd. for the first one i'd like to make, one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others if they have a very traditional review. so essentially, they have this view america's land of opportunity and that all people regardless of backgrounds can succeed. now this is not to say, but they have this even more so and this is how the answer poll questions and how they help explain a lot of there there policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. the scope of this. so these are some signs i took at a washington d.c. tea party protest here by the capital. you often see signs like this. don't spread my wealth. spread my work ethic. stop punishing and rewarding failure. this is all part of a common thing. and for this to make sense, i think we should go for some polling data. i'm going to show you some polling numbers that i've conducted with the recent rupaul that i directed the foundation. why actually had an opportunity to ask americans in general, but also tea partiers about how they perceive the fairness abou
at ucla. we could talk about this for a long time, but one of the things that, you know, what you need in order to get the median voter argument to work is a distribution of voters that is centered on the median obviously. >> right. right. right. >> so if we really think the country is moving away from the middle, that's going to change the behavior of parties and candidates. okay. i'm not sure that we're there yet, but to answer your question, if the people who are at the meed i can't remember are a little less sophisticated politically, what is that going to do? you know, i think another thing we know from coding a bunch of ads over the years, candidates make big statements in their advertising. >> yes. >> they tend not to be specific. we call those valance ads. the reason they do that, so that they can be all things to all people. they're like sort of the hero in a big budget film. they need to be every man. >> mitt romney, of course, has taken a very specific strategy in this campaign to not come out with specifics. in fact, he's been criticized by the political press with not comi
administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in october 2011 he focused on the impact that
in their community by investing in my education. i promise to come back as a doctor. with their help, i went to ucla and then to harvard medical school, where i became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an e.r. doctor. i am living proof of the american dream. for too many people, the american dream is in danger because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their savings. too many students cannot afford college. our congresswoman has lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they're focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points, and looking out for themselves and their wealthy donors. congresswoman's response to our problems is more of the same. more bickering, or partisanship, and more looking out for herself instead of us. instead of listening to people and proposing real solutions, she relies on the same old worn out partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or help seniors on fixed incomes. watch tonight how many time she talks and says empty phra
years of the reagan administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in oct
. and later vice president george bush and michael dukakis in 1988 from ucla. that's at 9:50 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> to focus on the presidential debates this month, c-span is asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of c-span's student cam video documentary competition. students will answer what's the most important issue that the president should answer for a chance to win $5,000 and there's $50,000 in total prizes. it's open for students age 6 through 12. go online to studentcam.org. >> next, republican ted cruz will debate paul saddler for the open texas senate seat vacated by kay bailey hutchyson. it's curtsy of kera tv. ted cruz is the former solictor of texas. it's just over an hour. >> this is the texas debate. we're broadcasting live from the kera studios in dallas and online at texasdebate.org. during the next hour i'll be the moderator for the final debate between republican ted cruz, the former solicitor of texas and paul saddler. welcome to our panelists -- ross ramsey, and pedro rojas, anchor for univision in houston. we invite you
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)